Massages

Deep tissue massage

Deep tissue massage

Deep tissue massage

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Deep tissue massage usually focuses on a specific problem, such as chronic muscle pain, injury rehabilitation, and the following conditions:

  • Low back pain
  • Limited mobility
  • Recovery from injuries (e.g. whiplash, falls)
  • Repetitive strain injury, such as carpal tunnel syndrome3 
  • Postural problems
  • Muscle tension in the hamstrings, glutes, IT band, legs, quadriceps, rhomboids, upper back
  • Osteoarthritis pain
  • Sciatica 
  • Piriformis syndrome4 
  • Tennis elbow
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Upper back or neck pain3 

Not all of these benefits have been scientifically proven. But if you are interested in a massage to prevent sports injury, address sport-specific concerns, or to help with muscle recovery after sports, consider getting a sports massage.


You should expect a fair amount of soreness in the days following your deep tissue massage. Your therapist may recommend treating with ice, heat, and stretching.

Swedish massage

Deep tissue massage

Deep tissue massage

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Swedish massage is one of the most commonly offered massage techniques. It’s sometimes called a classic massage. The technique aims to promote relaxation by releasing muscle tension.

Swedish massage is gentler than deep tissue massage and better suited for people interested in relaxation and tension relief.

Swedish massage may loosen up tight muscles caused by daily activities such as sitting at the computer or exercising. It can be very helpful for people who hold a lot of tension in their:

  • lower back
  • shoulders
  • neck

During a Swedish massage, therapists use:

  • kneading
  • long strokes
  • deep circular movements
  • passive joint movements

These techniques are meant to:

  • relax you
  • stimulate nerve endings
  • increase blood flow and lymph drainage

A traditional Swedish massage involves the whole body. You will begin on either your back or your stomach and flip over at the halfway point.

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